Senator Bob Mensch E-Newsletter

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In this Update:

  • Gordner and Mensch Introduce Growing Greener III Legislation
  • Letter to the Editor: Redistricting Advocates’ Priorities Remain Unclear
  • Senate Adopts Mensch Resolution to Encourage EPA to Provide More Stability in RIN Market
  • Senator Mensch Introduces Two Montgomery County Residents to PA Senate
  • Work Continues on 2021-22 State Budget
  • Senate Passes Plan for Voter Verification Constitutional Amendment
  • Senate Sends Bill to Rein in Health Secretary’s Power, Ban Vaccine Passports to Governor’s Desk
  • Bill to Expand Senior Access to Prescription Drugs Approved by Senate
  • Measure Offering Optional Year of Education Due to COVID-19 Goes to the Governor
  • Senate Votes to Permit Local Police Radar for Traffic Safety

Gordner and Mensch Introduce Growing Greener III Legislation

This week, myself and Senator John Gordner announced the introduction of legislation to enact a third round of the successful Growing Greener program. As introduced, Senate Bill 525 would provide $500 million to the Growing Greener fund, with 45% ($225 million) going to the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, 40% ($200 million) going to the Department of Environmental Protection and 15% ($75 million) going to the Department of Agriculture.  The funds would come from a portion of revenues received from the federal American Rescue Plan of 2021. Read more here.

Letter to the Editor: Redistricting Advocates’ Priorities Remain Unclear

Senate Bill 222, introduced by Senator Lisa Boscola, was referred to the Senate State Government Committee on February 26, 2021 where it awaits further consideration.

I have, and will continue to, support greater public participation and more openness and transparency in this process. What I do not support is increased subjectivity or more splitting of political subdivisions, like subjective provisions that result in unnecessary splits – i.e., a requirement that a county may not contain more:

  • Senatorial districts than required by population plus 1;
  • Representative districts than required by population plus 2 and;
  • Congressional districts that required by population plus 1.

There are still far too many unanswered questions, such as:

  • Who determines and how is a ‘community interest’ determined?
  • What are ‘widely accepted measured of responsiveness’ and how would they be applied?
  • What’s a ‘redistricting plan on a statewide basis?

Until these questions are answered, the priorities of this legislation and the advocates remain unclear. Read more in my latest Letter to the Editor.

Senate Adopts Mensch Resolution to Encourage EPA to Provide More Stability in RIN Market

6/24/21 - Senate Resolution 139

My Senate Resolution 139 was adopted this week by the Pennsylvania Senate. This Resolution encourages the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to consider and act quickly to implement strategies to help provide more certainty and price stability in the Renewable Identification Number (RIN) market.

Allowing RIN prices to spike to these levels makes it extraordinarily challenging for refiners to engage in midterm economic planning and budgeting – let alone to attract capital to undertake long-term major investments that create new, high-quality jobs. Read more here.

Senator Mensch Introduces Two Montgomery County Residents to PA Senate


This week, I was pleased to introduce Ms. Michelle Forsell and Ms. Sharon Shipe to the Pennsylvania Senate during their visit to Harrisburg. Ms. Forsell is a resident of Upper Hanover Township, Montgomery County, who currently practices at Wolf, Baldwin & Associates in Pennsburg, PA and focuses primarily on estate planning and administration, elder law, real estate, business law, and Veterans benefits. Ms. Shipe is a lifelong resident of Pennsylvania who currently resides in the Upper Perkiomen Valley of Montgomery County. She is a proud graduate of Kutztown, Lehigh and Villanova Universities, and she is beginning her 21st year in Pennsylvania public education working in various aspects of educational technology.
Read more here.

Work Continues on 2021-22 State Budget

Work continued this week on finalizing a state budget for the 2021-22 fiscal year. Earlier this year, Gov. Tom Wolf proposed a huge spending plan with a massive increase in the personal income tax. A majority of lawmakers in the Senate and House of Representatives rejected the plan.

Look for a report on the new budget in next week’s e-newsletter.

Senate Passes Plan for Voter Verification Constitutional Amendment

The Senate this week approved a plan to allow voters to decide if the Pennsylvania Constitution should be amended to require identification each time a voter casts a ballot. Read more here.

Currently, voters are required to show identification only the first time they vote at a polling place. The proposed constitutional amendment asks voters to decide if some form of verification should be required every time a ballot is cast, including when voting by mail.

A recent poll by Franklin & Marshall College found 74% of Pennsylvanians favored requirements that all voters show a photo ID and only 25% opposed. Nationally, that number climbs to 80% in support of some sort of identification to vote and drops to 18% opposed, according to a Monmouth University poll.

With Gov. Tom Wolf’s refusal to consider legislation that asks voters to provide verification every time they vote, the Senate passed a bill to place the issue on the ballot as a proposed constitutional amendment so voters can decide. Unlike a piece of legislation, constitutional amendments do not need the governor’s approval.

Senate Sends Bill to Rein in Health Secretary’s Power, Ban Vaccine Passports to Governor’s Desk

The Senate gave final approval of legislation that prevents the excess use of power by the state Secretary of Health and prohibits vaccine passport requirements while ensuring the protection of public health. Read more here.

The measure prohibits the Secretary of Health from mandating those who have not been exposed or in close contact with the exposed to wear a mask, stay at home or be socially distant. It also prevents the secretary from using the same laws to force business closures.

It also prohibits the state, as well as counties, municipalities, school districts and colleges that are subsidized by state taxpayers from requiring proof of vaccination. The measure will now go to Gov. Wolf’s desk. He will have 10 days to sign the bill into law, veto it or allow the bill to become law without his signature.

Bill to Expand Senior Access to Prescription Drugs Approved by Senate

Legislation to expand senior access to prescription drugs received Senate approval and was sent to the House of Representatives for consideration.

The measure:

  • Expands the income eligibility of the PACENET senior prescription drug program by $6,000 for both individuals and married couples;
  • Removes the requirement that a PACENET cardholder pay a monthly premium; and
  • Provides the department with discretion to have cardholders enrolled in a Medicare Part D plan that meets their prescription needs.

The anticipated savings from enrolling eligible PACENET individuals in Medicare Part D plans will provide enough savings to cover the cost of the income expansion.

Measure Offering Optional Year of Education Due to COVID-19 Goes to the Governor

Parents would have the option to allow their children to repeat a grade level due to learning disruptions caused by COVID-19 under a bill approved by the Senate and sent to the governor. Read more here.

In current practice, the decision on whether to hold a student back is made solely by the child’s school and teacher. The bill would only apply to the 2021-22 school year to address learning gaps related to the pandemic.

Senate Bill 664 would also give parents the option to extend enrollment in special education programs for an extra year due to COVID-19. This provision would prevent students with special needs from aging out of the system at age 21 after missing out on much of the specialized attention they need due to COVID-19 disruptions.

Gov. Wolf will have 10 days to sign the bill into law, veto it or allow it to become law without his signature.

Senate Votes to Permit Local Police Radar for Traffic Safety

The Senate approved and sent to the House of Representatives legislation permitting municipal police in Pennsylvania to use radar for speed limit enforcement.

Speeding is the leading contributor to fatal crashes after DUI and 30% of fatal speeding crashes occur on local roads. Pennsylvania is the only state that prohibits municipal police from using radar to enforce speed limits.

The new enforcement tool would come with several restrictions:

  • Prohibiting convictions if the speed recorded is less than 10 miles per hour over the speed limit where the posted limit is less than 70 miles per hour.
  • Setting a revenue cap on the amount of money a municipality may keep from speeding tickets at no more than 10% of its municipal budget.
  • Requiring a municipality to adopt an ordinance before allowing police to use radar.
  • Setting calibration standards for the use of radar guns.
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